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Posts for: January, 2019

By Dental Horizons
January 28, 2019
Category: Oral Health
Tags: gum recession  
RecessedGumsCouldEndangerYourTeeth

A "toothy grin" might be endearing, but not necessarily healthy. More of the teeth showing may mean your gums have pulled back or receded from the teeth. If so, it's not just your smile that suffers—the parts of teeth protected by the gums could become more susceptible to disease.

There are a number of causes for gum recession. Some people are more likely to experience it because of genetically thinner gum tissues. Over-aggressive brushing could also contribute to recession. But the most common cause by far is periodontal (gum) disease, a bacterial infection triggered by dental plaque accumulating on teeth mainly as a result of inadequate hygiene.

There are some things we can do to help heal and restore recessed gums, most importantly treating gum disease. The number one goal of treatment is to uncover and remove all dental plaque from tooth and gum surfaces, which can take several sessions and sometimes minor surgery if the infection has reached the tooth roots. But removing plaque and tartar (calcified plaque) is necessary to stop the infection and allow the gums to heal.

For mild recession, this may be enough for the gums to regain normal coverage. But in more severe cases we may need to help rejuvenate new tissue with grafting surgery. In these highly meticulous procedures a surgeon uses microscopic techniques to position and attach donated tissue to the recession site. The graft serves as a scaffold on which new tissue growth can occur.

While these treatments can be effective for reversing gum recession, they often require time, skill and expense. It's much better to try to prevent gum recession—and gum disease—in the first place. Prevention begins with daily brushing and flossing to prevent plaque buildup, as well as regular dental visits for more thorough cleanings. Be on the lookout too for any signs of a beginning gum infection like swollen, reddened or bleeding gums and see your dentist as soon as possible to minimize any damage to your gums.

Caring for your gums is equally as important as caring for your teeth. Healthy gums equal a healthy mouth—and an attractive smile.

If you would like more information on preventing gum recession, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Gum Recession.”


GetRidofThoseUnattractiveTeethwithPorcelainVeneers

Those unattractive teeth you see in the mirror are what are standing between you and a truly beautiful smile. If only you could make them go away.

In a way, you can do just that—with dental veneers. For the past three decades dentists have been covering the imperfections of problem teeth with these thin layers of porcelain. What's more, they're usually less involved and expensive than other restorations.

Veneers work best on teeth with moderate flaws like chipping, heavy staining or wearing, or slight misalignments like crookedness or gaps. The dental porcelain used is a ceramic material that so closely mimics the color and translucence of natural teeth it often takes a trained eye to notice any difference.

The first step to getting veneers is to plan your new look with a full examination and a diagnostic mock-up, a temporary application of tooth-colored filling materials applied directly to the teeth. This gives you and your dentist a better visual idea of how veneers will look on your teeth, and to make any adjustments ahead of time. A dental lab will use these findings to create your custom veneers.

In the meantime we'll prepare your teeth to accommodate your veneers. Although they're usually only 0.3 to 0.7 millimeters thick, veneers can still appear bulky when placed straight on the teeth. To adjust for their width we usually must remove some of the teeth's surface enamel so the veneers look more natural. Because enamel can't be replaced, the removal permanently alters the teeth and will require some form of restoration from then on.

When the veneers are ready we'll attach them with special cement so they'll form an almost seamless bond with the teeth. You'll then be able to use them just as before—but with a little caution. Although quite durable, veneers can break under too much force, so avoid biting on hard objects like ice, hard candy or nuts. And be sure you practice good dental care on your veneered teeth with daily brushing and regular dental cleanings and checkups.

The end result, though, is well worth the upkeep. Porcelain veneers can rejuvenate your smile and provide you a new level of confidence for years to come.

If you would like more information on porcelain veneers, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Porcelain Veneers: Your Smile—Better than Ever.”


By Dental Horizons
January 08, 2019
Category: Oral Health
Tags: mouthguards  
WanttoKeepEnjoyingWinterSportsWearaMouthguard

What's your favorite winter sport? For some, it's all about swooshing down a snowy trail on skis, a board, or a sled. For others, the main attraction is skating at an ice rink or a frozen pond. If you're more of an indoors athlete, you may enjoy a fast-moving game of basketball or a round of squash. Or, you might take a turn on a climbing wall or a trampoline.

What do all these activities have in common? They're fun, they're great exercise…and they all come with a risk of injury to your teeth.

It's easy to see how a collision on snow or ice could result in a blow to the mouth. But did you know that basketball (along with hockey) is among the sports with the highest risk of facial injury? What's more, many "non-contact" sports actually have a similar risk.

Located front and center in the face, the incisors (front teeth) are the ones most likely to sustain injury. Unfortunately, they are also the most visible teeth in your smile. With all of the advances in modern dentistry, it's possible to restore or replace damaged teeth in almost any situation—but the cost can be high, both for present restoration and future preservation. Is there a better alternative?

Yes! It isn't sitting at home—it's wearing a custom-made mouthguard when there's a risk of facial injury.

Most people don't ski or play hockey without protective gear like a helmet. A mouthguard can effectively protect against dental injury that might otherwise be serious. Available here at the dental office, a custom mouthguard is made from an exact model of your own teeth, so it's comfortable to wear and fits perfectly—but no safety equipment can work if you don't use it!

So whether you like to hit the trails or the gym this winter, don't forget to bring a custom-made mouthguard. It's a small piece of gear that can save you from a big headache!

If you would like more information on mouthguards, please contact us or schedule a consultation. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Athletic Mouthguards” and “An Introduction to Sports Injuries & Dentistry.”